EVOLUTIONARY POSSIBILITIES OF DEMOCRATIZATION AND ATAVISTIC NATIONALISM: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF UNRECOGNIZED STATES

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Hilmi Ulas

Abstract

The question of how rising atavistic nationalism will affect democracies worldwide is an essential one of our time. In this paper, I focus instead on conducting a comparative historical analysis of atavistic nationalism in two unrecognized states: North Cyprus and Taiwan. I argue that the democratic crisis of our times is, in its essence, economic and has been precipitated by the failure of democracies to build domestic capacities to support democratic values. Furthermore, I posit that engaging populaces at the local political level will prove essential to preserving democracies around the world. I conclude by underlining that atavistic nationalism is indeed a significant threat to regional and global peace and requires further co-operation on trade and governance, and should be engaged at the local level. Lastly, I suggest that co-creating local cultures that will act to soften atavistic nationalism, which feeds off the perception of threats and fear.

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How to Cite
Ulas, H. . (2021). EVOLUTIONARY POSSIBILITIES OF DEMOCRATIZATION AND ATAVISTIC NATIONALISM: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF UNRECOGNIZED STATES. Journal of Liberty and International Affairs, 6(3), 11-23. https://doi.org/10.47305/JLIA2163011u
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Author Biography

Hilmi Ulas, Chapman University, California, USA

Dr. Hilmi Ulas is an Assistant Professor of Peace Studies at Chapman University (Orange, CA). He previously served as the Chair of the Department of Political Science and Public Administration at the American University of Cyprus (Cyprus). He holds an MS and a PhD in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University's Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution, as well as a BA in Political Science and French from Grinnell College. His academic expertise lies in genocide studies, nonviolence, and the roles of democratization and unrecognized states/non-recognition in conflicts. His published works range from academic to policy papers, and he regularly presents his research in international conferences.

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